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The anger over Boris Johnson is growing

The anger over Boris Johnson is growing

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has triggered a storm of outrage with his compulsory break from parliament. On Wednesday night, hundreds of people gathered in front of the Parliament and the seat of government Downing Street in London to protest against the parliamentary resolution. An online petition against the controversial measure cracked in the night to Thursday the million mark. Activist and businesswoman Gina Miller reportedly said she has taken legal action against the decision.

Miller had already 2017 won a lawsuit against the government, which concerned Parliament’s rights in the EU withdrawal declaration. The online petition registered more than 1.1 million virtual signatures early Thursday morning. The initiators demand that parliamentary action not be interrupted as long as Britain does not postpone leaving the European Union or withdraw its resignation. Any citizen can bring in such petitions, but above all, they are symbolic.

Also in his own party, Johnson triggered a heated controversy. According to media reports, the head of the Scottish Conservatives, Ruth Davidson, announced her resignation on Thursday. Therefore, the reasons for the politician’s withdrawal are above all private reasons, but the time gave rise to speculation about a deep rift in the party: Davidson was Johnson’s bitterest inner-party rival in the pre-Brexit referendum and is a determined no-deal opponent. She was once considered a bearer of hope in the Tory party.

Queen Elizabeth II had granted Johnson’s application on Wednesday

Johnson had announced Wednesday the lower house even before the EU exit on 14. Imposing a forced break on October. Queen Elizabeth II granted the application. The parliament remains with it only a window of time of a few days, in order to prevent an EU exit without agreement by the law. But this is hard to cope with given the many hurdles in the legislative process.

Johnson is threatened with a chaotic Brexit if the EU does not agree to his request for changes to the withdrawal agreement. He had repeatedly warned in recent days that Brussels should not rely on MPs preventing a no-deal. If it actually happens, drastic consequences for the economy on both sides of the Channel are expected.

Sticking point in the dispute between the EU and London remains the backstop

Sticking point in the dispute between London and Brussels is mainly the so-called backstop. This clause would bind Britain to certain EU rules until another solution to avoid border controls between the EU member Ireland and the British province of Northern Ireland has been found. London sees this as unacceptable shackles. The exit agreement has already failed three times in parliament.

The lower house will meet for the first time after the summer break next week. The four-and-a-half-week compulsory break begins in the following week. It should end only when the Queen .

There is enough time for all the necessary debates, Johnson said in a letter to members on Wednesday. “If I manage to negotiate a deal with the EU, Parliament will have the opportunity to pass the law needed to ratify such a deal 31. October. ”

Parliament President John Bercow spoke of a” crime in the constitution “. Johnson’s former Chancellor and Party colleague, Philip Hammond, tweeted, “Deeply undemocratic.” It would be a shame if Parliament were kept from looking at the government in times of national crisis.

Opposition leader and Labo boss Jeremy Corbyn announced despite the compulsory break an attempt to prevent the no-deal Brexit by law. He also wants to submit a motion of no confidence against the government “in due course”. Whether there would currently be a majority for this is uncertain.(

Federal President invites citizens

Federal President invites citizens

No thunderstorms – nevertheless almost 50 flights are canceled due to bad weather

No thunderstorms – nevertheless almost 50 flights are canceled due to bad weather